Entertainment Design Minor

Earning a minor in Entertainment Design furthers your ability to effectively create 2-D images while gaining an understanding of the concept illustrator’s studio processes, business practices, and history. It encourages the creation of a variety of imagery related to storytelling for Entertainment Design applications. Topics covered include environment, character, prop design, and storyboarding. A minor in Entertainment Design enables you to become a more well-rounded artist, and provides an opportunity to create quality, portfolio-worthy pieces relevant to a variety of career opportunities.

Course Listing

Fundamentals of Maya

Course ID: FD158
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course introduces the students to the complex interface of Maya, one of the leading software programs in animation and graphic design industries. Students will learn how to navigate Maya's interface exploring basic modeling, rigging, lighting, texture, and camera set-up.

Fundamentals of Maya

Course ID: FD158
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course introduces the students to the complex interface of Maya, one of the leading software programs in animation and graphic design industries. Students will learn how to navigate Maya's interface exploring basic modeling, rigging, lighting, texture, and camera set-up.

Pictorial Design for Illustration

Course ID: FD160
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course introduces 2-D design principles in constructing pictorial imagery. The relationship between the principles of design and formal elements of art are addressed, and how these components apply to composition and illustrative applications. Appropriate and effective fusions of form and function and illustrative styles and strategies are also explored.

Pictorial Design for Illustration

Course ID: FD160
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course introduces 2-D design principles in constructing pictorial imagery. The relationship between the principles of design and formal elements of art are addressed, and how these components apply to composition and illustrative applications. Appropriate and effective fusions of form and function and illustrative styles and strategies are also explored.

3-D Design 2

Course ID: IL212
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: FD158
Requirement: R
Course Description:
In this course students will learn the skills to texture and light objects and characters as well as model more efficiently and accurately. Students will use texture editing systems to adhere and manipulate textures onto form. Students learn to model in polygons as well as model within the surfaces offered within Zbrush software (i.e., subdivision surfaces).

3-D Design 2

Course ID: IL212
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: FD158
Requirement: R
Course Description:
In this course students will learn the skills to texture and light objects and characters as well as model more efficiently and accurately. Students will use texture editing systems to adhere and manipulate textures onto form. Students learn to model in polygons as well as model within the surfaces offered within Zbrush software (i.e., subdivision surfaces).

Visual Storytelling for Entertainment

Course ID: IL218
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: FD166, FD151, FD160
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course focuses on storytelling with pictures. Students learn the relationship between character and story development, and how to compose images and arrange them in sequence to present a coherent and emotionally effective story. Students also work on public speaking skills by pitching their story to the class.

Visual Storytelling for Entertainment

Course ID: IL218
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: FD166, FD151, FD160
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course focuses on storytelling with pictures. Students learn the relationship between character and story development, and how to compose images and arrange them in sequence to present a coherent and emotionally effective story. Students also work on public speaking skills by pitching their story to the class.

Concept Design for Entertainment

Course ID: IL301
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: FD166
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This is an advanced course in visualization, art direction and production design with an emphasis on the organization of all the pictorial components in a visual system supporting a narrative content. The conceptualization of design choices, the calibration of stylistic parameters and other world building techniques will be explored through the creation of detailed concept art and the elaboration of a complete style guide.

Concept Design for Entertainment

Course ID: IL301
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: FD166
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This is an advanced course in visualization, art direction and production design with an emphasis on the organization of all the pictorial components in a visual system supporting a narrative content. The conceptualization of design choices, the calibration of stylistic parameters and other world building techniques will be explored through the creation of detailed concept art and the elaboration of a complete style guide.

Storyboarding for Entertainment

Course ID: IL325
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: IL218
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course teaches students to develop and create a sequential series of staged drawings (that is, the visual script of each scene in a film). The course covers how to effectively portray the essence of a story by means of quick and accurate sketches. A brief overview of script writing is included. The script's plot, situations, and conflict are developed from rough sketches to finished presentations. This course also examines staging, cinematography, drama, action notes, dialogue, pacing, timing, and sequencing the story's action.

Storyboarding for Entertainment

Course ID: IL325
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: IL218
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course teaches students to develop and create a sequential series of staged drawings (that is, the visual script of each scene in a film). The course covers how to effectively portray the essence of a story by means of quick and accurate sketches. A brief overview of script writing is included. The script's plot, situations, and conflict are developed from rough sketches to finished presentations. This course also examines staging, cinematography, drama, action notes, dialogue, pacing, timing, and sequencing the story's action.