Laguna College of Art and Design

Course Listings

Mesoamerican Empires of the Aztec and Maya

Course ID: AH114
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
An introductory course exploring the art and architecture of Mesoamerica from the rise of the Olmec in 1500 BCE to the Spanish conquest of the Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan in 1521, Mesoamerican Empires will focus on how changes in visual culture have reflected larger religious and political transformations in Mesoamerica. Issues of cultural memory and myth will be examined to understand indigenous conceptions of art, history, cosmology, and social hierarchy. Forging links with the present day, students will learn to identify and contextualize Mesoamerican iconography in contemporary media including the creative expression of lowrider culture, tattoos, fine art, and fashion. Students will be required to demonstrate their understanding of the material through visual (art) projects, a formal writing assignment, and their participation in class discussions. No prerequisites.

Intro to Asian Art and Culture

Course ID: AH115
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This course is an exploration of art and visual culture from the Asian continent. Focusing on art works as historical, cultural, and social documents, we will examine how art was commissioned, collected, and used by royalty, the elite, popular audiences, and religious communities in both rural and urban settings. Different themes discussed include art as an instrument of power and propaganda, as a tool for social and religious ritual, an expression of status and prestige, a medium for social protest, as well as a product for the marketplace. Beginning with Bronze Age objects for ritual purposes, subsequent artforms include scroll paintings in the Song Dynasty, women’s painting and printed books, Japanese secular emaki scrolls and ukioy-e art, the luxury of Mughal art in India, and true-view landscape painting in Korea. Students are required to do class readings and engage actively in class discussion, complete two papers, create a final project, and make a final presentation. No prerequisites.

Ancient Civ: Egypt-Greece-Rome

Course ID: AH116
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
If consciousness is shaped by our history, then where are we, collectively, if we’ve lost faith that a shared historical commonality among cultures ever existed? To the people who thrived in the strange and beautiful empires of ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome, religious and cultural differences found in one’s neighbors weren’t unusual, confusing or frightening—they were part of everyday life. In short: normal coexistence. In the class Egypt, Greece, Rome—we’ll explore the commonalities and shared experiences found among these three remarkable civilizations, as well as follow the cultural fault lines exploited by those in power which eventually forced these empires to dissolve. Together, we’ll explore three millennia of artefacts, objects, architecture, writings, as well as cultural and religious practice to see how these civilizations evolved, ran alongside one another, then overlapped and overcame one another to lay the foundations of modern western society. Through lecture, images, discussions, essays, and close readings, students will learn to identify, decode, understand and describe artworks and objects from the past, translating them from visual to verbal and textual language. In addition, in an effort to gain insight into the ancient state of mind, students will reconstruct a piece of history with a hands-on laboratory project and a small, original artwork of their own. No prerequisites.

The Medieval World

Course ID: AH204
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
The Middle Ages were a time of knights and ladies... or maybe brutal Viking warlords... or a clash of civilizations between Christians and Muslims... and maybe there were dragons? A lot of what we “know” about the medieval world comes from fantasy, pop culture, and from old nationalist scholarship that mostly invented origin myths. So, how can we know what the Middle Ages were really like? In this class, we’ll go back and try to get a more accurate picture by looking at things medieval people made: manuscripts, sculptures, buildings, weapons, clothing, etc., all in tandem with reading primary sources by the people who were there. Starting with the collapse of the western Roman Empire, we will uncover a different picture of how two related cultures arose out of the wreckage of the ancient world: Christendom and Dar al-Islam. Along the way we’ll learn that the “barbarians” weren’t that barbaric, that some Vikings converted to Islam, that trade and cooperation across the Mediterranean were far more common than Crusades, and that the medieval world was more diverse, cosmopolitan, and queer than you may have been led to believe. No prerequisites.

Nature in Art: Japan, Korea, Tibet

Course ID: AH205
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
Nature in Art explores the rich and varied traditions of artistic expression unique to the regions of Japan, Korea, and Tibet, from prehistoric indigenous practices through the mid-19th century. Looking closely at Japan, the Korean renaissance, and the coded art of Tibetan Buddhist culture, we will uncover the distinct artistic heritage found in each, noting particularly the sharing and transmission of art practices and ideas as they cross geographical and cultural boundaries. Working chronologically, this course will identify intersections of spirituality and nature, then examine artistic expressions of such concepts through lacquer, ceramic, ink, paper, stone, bamboo and ivory, among other media. Both two- and three-dimensional art forms are considered, from calligraphy, wood-block prints and landscape painting to festivals, garden design, poetry, and tea ceremonies. The objects and sites studied in this course will reflect how concepts of beauty and aesthetics are achieved through the practice of “harmony, respect, purity, and tranquility.” The course is conducted as a hybrid seminar-lecture style course, with instructor led lectures and video, student presentations, research, writing, culinary experiences, as well as hands-on exploration of the traditional processes of historic art production in these regions. This class requires a visit to the USC Pacific Asia Museum to see art in person from each of the regions studied in this class. No prerequisites.

Illuminating Women: Female Artists, Scientists, Poets, Philosphers of the Renaisance

Course ID: AH206
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: AH114 OR AH115
Requirement: E
Course Description:
People often wonder exactly when, throughout history, women first started to become active in society? Of course, the answer is: Always. Even though women’s efforts have been overshadowed by that of their male contemporaries in the chronicling of official histories, women have always participated in every facet of life, from rich to poor, north to south, east to west, and from the ancient period to the present. In this course, we will examine the lives and creative pursuits of the many women who contributed to the arts, sciences, and humanities throughout history, particularly focusing on artists & craftspersons, writers & poets, healers, pharmacists, natural philosophers, and rulers, with a few warriors included for good measure. Students will conduct close readings, originate research, formulate short essays, and in an effort to gain insight into the state of mind of historical women, reconstruct a piece of history with a hands-on laboratory project and a small, original artwork placing themselves in the environment of a chosen historical female. Prerequisite: AH210, or one course from the Ancient Civilizations category. This course can be taken concurrently with one class from the Medieval Worlds in Motion category. 3 units.

Age of Michelangelo, 1450-1550

Course ID: AH207
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: AH114 OR AH115
Requirement: E
Course Description:
“Force yourself to imitate Michelangelo in everything.” These were the words expressed by Michelangelo’s biographer to a remarkably self-aware generation of artists in 16th-century Florence, Rome, and Venice. However, whether rival artists wanted to, or even imagined they could succeed in imitating Michelangelo’s work is another question—one among many we’ll explore in The Age of Michelangelo, 1450-1550. In consultation with a range of visual, historical, and literary materials, we’ll delve into the spirit of the age, looking at drawing, painting, sculpture, furniture and garden design, food, weaponry, architecture, and urban planning, as well as people. We’ll tap into the players and personalities of the times—Leonardo, Giorgione, Raphael, Sofonisba Anguissola, Titian—as well as Isabella d’Este, the Della Rovere, and the Medici families who sought to shape their immediate world through power, imagination, and the artistry of their times. Students will conduct close readings, originate research, formulate essays, and in an effort to gain insight into the Renaissance state of mind reconstruct a piece of history with a hands-on laboratory project and a small, original artwork of their own. Prerequisite: AH210, or one course from Ancient Civilizations category (AH100 series). This course can be taken concurrently with Medieval Worlds in Motion category (AH200 series).

Wordly + Otherworldly Creatures

Course ID: AH305
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: AH114 OR AH115
Requirement: E
Course Description:
For centuries, earthly creatures, charmed animals and otherworldly beings conjured by artisans, magicians, folklorists, natural philosophers, and physicians, have inspired both wonder and delight as well as revulsion, alarm, and terror in the hearts and minds of otherwise thinking persons. Considering beasts and beings of all sorts, both earthly and divine, this course seeks to investigate the origin stories of such creatures and inquire as to what motivations compel an individual or society to conjure such creatures. From the Classical World to Medieval Scandinavia, from the Americas to Slavic Europe, this course explores how art and monstrosity intersected in the cultural imagination to both delightful and devastating effect. In consultation with a range of visual and literary primary materials, including the Great Chain of Being, the Malleus Maleficarum (the Witches Hammer), and Della Porta’s How We May Produce New and Strange Monsters, students will conduct close readings, originate research, formulate essays and create original artwork of their own in an effort to gain insight into earlier states of mind as well as open avenues into wholly new creations. All readings for the course will be in English, although international and graduate students may be asked to give additional reports on texts written in other languages.

History of Animation

Course ID: AH332
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: LA104
Requirement: R
Course Description:
The course examines the development of animation from its inception through present-day manifestations in television, films, and the Internet. Major animators and key works are analyzed and discussed. Required for Animation majors.

History of Graphic Design

Course ID: AH334
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: LA104
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course examines the emergence of graphic design and the professional designer from 1800 C.E. to the present. Continual conceptual and technological revolution is the essence of this subject and the theme of this course. Required for Graphic Design majors.

Los Tres Grandes: Mexican Muralist Movement

Course ID: AH404
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: AH114 OR AH115, AH204 OR AH205 OR AH206 OR AH207 OR AH305
Requirement: E
Course Description:
Los Tres Grandes explores the Mexican Muralist movement of the 1920s from its beginnings under the post-Mexican Revolution government to its present-day influence on Chicanx and Street artists. Utilizing a curricular framework centered on Los Tres Grandes (the big three), Diego Rivera, José Clemente Orozco and David Alfaro Siqueiros, our studies will then expand to include further influential figures such as Frida Kahlo and Rufino Tamayo among others. Students will be required to demonstrate their understanding of the material through visual (art) projects, a formal writing assignment, and participation in class discussions. Prerequisite: One course from Ancient Civilizations category (AH100 series) and one course from either Medieval Worlds or Renaissance Worlds in Motion category

Traditional Arts of Western Africa

Course ID: AH405
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: AH114 OR AH115, AH204 OR AH205 OR AH206 OR AH207 OR AH305
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This course examines a diverse array of art created by different ethnic groups in West Africa from pre-colonial through the 19th century and beyond. Through the lens of both spiritual and cultural traditions, we will consider a wide range of styles and materials, and ask how meaning is derived from objects and practices, keeping in mind particular challenges that emerge when studying art that is both permanent and impermanent. The significance of oral traditions will be studied, as well as the roles of ancestor spirits, mythical creatures, divination and initiation rites, and how music, dance, and masking function in establishing power, status, political, and social conventions. Objects created exclusively for performative and ritual uses, art in service to royalty, sculpture, utilitarian objects, architecture, performance, and the body as subject and site of adornment will form the core of our studies. Materials studied will include metal, wood, textiles, mud, ivory, beads, bone, dung, and blood/bodily fluids. While important, this class does not intend to cover present-day political crises, border disputes, or changing social constructs in West Africa. This course is conducted with instructor led lecture, film, guided reading and discussions, student presentations based on independent research, and other exploratory exercises. A visit to the UCLA Fowler Museum is required for this class. Students will experience textile creation and the development of personal symbolism in a hands-on project. Prerequisite: One course from Ancient Civilizations category (AH100 series) and one course from either Medieval Worlds or Renaissance Worlds in Motion category (AH200/AH300 series).

Modern Visualities: 19th-20th Century Photography in South and East Asia

Course ID: AH406
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: AH114 OR AH115, AH204 OR AH205 OR AH206 OR AH207 OR AH305
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This course will examine the relationship between visuality and technology as expressed by photographers of the 19th- and 20th-centuries. Materials and readings for the course will focus on the roles and development of photography primarily in India, Afghanistan, China, and Japan, and the alterations it engendered in the perception and depiction of the world. We will examine the use of photography in the service of journalism and news reporting, ethnographic studies and geographical awareness, science, propaganda, tourism, entertainment, and of course, art. Beginning with Western photographers’ images of a distant “Orient,” this course will conclude with the uses of photography in contemporary Asian art, looking particularly at themes of national and personal identities as well as commentary on traditions. Students are required to do class readings and engage actively in class discussion, complete two papers, submit one individual project related to the course apparatus, and make a final presentation. Projects deriving from other time periods or regions are welcome, for example, photography from Imperial Russia or the Ottoman Empire. Prerequisite: One course from Ancient Civilizations category (AH100 series) and one course from either Medieval Worlds or Renaissance Worlds in Motion category (AH200/AH300 series).

Exiles in L.A.: Art, Architecture, Film of Wartime Émigrés

Course ID: AH407
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: AH114 OR AH115, AH204 OR AH205 OR AH206 OR AH207 OR AH305
Requirement: E
Course Description:
Los Angeles, not known for being a bastion of either culture or liberalism during the early twentieth century, was—for a time—both a cradle of high-modernism and a refuge from the charnel house of European fascism. Icons such as poet and playwright Bertolt Brecht, Marxist philosopher Theodor Adorno, noir filmmakers Fritz Lang and Billy Wilder, composers Arnold Schoenberg and Igor Stravinski, novelists Thomas Mann and Aldous Huxley, and architects Richard Neutra and Rudolph Schindler, many of whom had fled the Nazis, made their homes in Los Angeles. In this course, we will examine the lives and major works of the many refugees and exiles who transformed LA’s intellectual and aesthetic culture in the 1940s, as well as look closely at three critical aspects of their enduring legacy. First, the transnational exchange of aesthetic and intellectual history between Europe and the United States; Second, the effects of fascism on aesthetics and its implications; and Third, the degree to which the creative output of European émigrés provided survival strategies in the wake of such genocidal and illiberal ideologies. What, in other words, can we glean from Brecht’s poetry, from Adorno’s “reflections from damaged life,” from Fritz Lang’s deeply expressionistic noir films, from Huxley’s Brave New World? Through the consumption of text and images representing this history students will create a project utilizing this aesthetic and intellectual history of art (and artists) as a means of strategizing survival in today’s climate. Prerequisite: One course from Ancient Civilizations category (AH100 series) and one course from either Medieval Worlds or Renaissance Worlds in Motion category (AH200/AH300 series).

Living Through History: American Culture Wars

Course ID: AH408
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: AH114 OR AH115, AH204 OR AH205 OR AH206 OR AH207 OR AH305
Requirement: E
Course Description:
Since 1954 when the Supreme Court handed down its decision in Brown v. Board of Education, the people of the United States have been engaged in a series of “culture wars” concerned primarily with identity—particularly race and gender—and a grappling with its morally ambiguous past. This deep and alienating sense of polarization and clashing of identities—some voluntary and others forced upon us—has only intensified over the years, coming to an explosive climax in the chaotic and tragic years of 2020-21. Everything from the anti-mask movement and “cancel culture” to the fate of Confederate Statues and defunding the police falls under the rubric of a longstanding, and increasingly tribal culture war in the United States. In this course we will look at the broad historical context of the 1960s from which these battles emerged and trace them through the present. In doing so, we will pay close attention to the ways in which the expansion of rights, freedoms, and liberties for historically marginalized groups has elicited conservative reactions seeking to roll back those gains through an often sectarian vision of American culture and history. This course will focus on flashpoints or sites of contestation—Roe v. Wade, the Oklahoma City Bombing, the rise of “Alt-Right” groups such as the Proud Boys, recent controversies about “Big Tech” censorship, the fate of civil rights, Black Lives Matter protests, and the violent denouement of the Trump Administration. Students will produce written responses to the readings and also formulate a final project determining the role of art and the artist in meeting this particular historical moment. Prerequisite: One course from Ancient Civilizations category (AH100 series) and one course from either Medieval Worlds or Renaissance Worlds in Motion category (AH200/AH300 series).

Exhibition Design

Course ID: AH409
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: AH114 OR AH115, AH204 OR AH205 OR AH206 OR AH207 OR AH305
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This course will introduce students to current theoretical and real-world applications of exhibition design operating today in museums, galleries, and contemporary art spaces, both real and virtual. Through weekly in-person exploration of cultural sites in and around Orange County and Los Angeles, students will observe and critique aesthetic and practical decisions made by professional curators and exhibition designers, with particular emphases on structural layout, cultural themes, the curation and arrangement of objects, and how artworks interact with one another in outdoor and indoor spaces. In doing so, students will sharpen their perceptive skills, strengthen their discourse specific to the fields of art production, curation, collecting, and museum studies, and pursue theoretical examples of design brought to life within the rich artistic landscape of Southern California. Students produce written journal entries, participate in discussions, produce directed reading responses to museum catalogues, articles, and other didactic material, as well as participate in oral presentations and collaborative hands-on projects. Prerequisite: One course from Ancient Civilizations category (AH100 series) and one course from either Medieval Worlds or Renaissance Worlds in Motion category (AH200/AH300 series).

Fund Comp + Color: Digital

Course ID: FD118
Course Credits: 2
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course investigates principles of pictorial organization through the relationship of composition and color of visual elements. This includes the study of formal qualities of art; line, shape, value, texture, rhythm, space, balance, proportion, movement, unity, harmony, and tension. Studies of color address properties of hue, value, and intensity, as well as color interactions of harmony, discord, and simultaneous contrast. Special emphasis is given to concepts necessary for visual communication, regardless of media, but this course will utilize digital tools as a way to explore the concepts efficiently and to prepare students for contemporary expectations of commercial art and design professions. Primary software: Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Photoshop.

Fundamentals of Graphic Design

Course ID: FD123
Course Credits: 2
Pre-Requisite: FD127
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This foundation course explores basic graphic design methods, processes, techniques, and formats. Assignments introduce elements, media, and principles of graphic design from historical and contemporary perspectives and emphasize visual representation aimed to communicate ideas and non-visual content. Students will use Adobe's Creative Suite 3 (CS3) software.

Fund of Digital Imaging 1 - Photoshop

Course ID: FD127
Course Credits: 2
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This lecture and studio course introduces principles of creative visualization with the use of the computer and pixel based imaging software. Comprehension of key terms and concepts are taught, with projects designed to develop practical software skills and aesthetic development. Emphasis is placed upon working with imagery from digital cameras, scanners, and generating original computer graphics. Topics include photo-retouching, digital drawing and painting, digital montage, color modes, and preparing files for printing and web based display. Primary software: Adobe Photoshop.

Fund of Digital Imaging 2 - Illustrator

Course ID: FD129
Course Credits: 2
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This lecture and studio course is focused on the use vector based imaging software for drawing and design. Comprehension of key terms and concepts are taught, with projects designed to develop practical software skills and aesthetic development. Emphasis is placed upon use of vector drawing tools, stylization techniques, and integration with pixel graphics. Topics include simplification of form, technical drawing, pattern creation, and perspective studies. Primary software: Adobe Illustrator.

Fundamentals of 3D

Course ID: FD137
Course Credits: 2
Pre-Requisite: FD127, FD129
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course will focus on an introduction to 3D. Students will learn the key features of modeling, animation, lighting, texturing, physic dynamics and camera technique through Autodesk Maya.

Fundamentals of Motion Graphics

Course ID: FD142
Course Credits: 2
Pre-Requisite: FD127, FD129
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course is an introduction to the process of creating motion graphics.The core applications used in this course are Adobe After Effects, Premiere, Photoshop, and illustrator. Students will also be creating video content to use in their motion graphics work.

Fundamentals of Type

Course ID: FD144
Course Credits: 2
Pre-Requisite: FD145 OR FD151
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course covers the history, theory and practice of letterforms and typography they apply to other areas of design, graphics and visual communication. Projects cover principles of typography, letter structure, typeface selection, fundamentals of digital type, and typographic layout.

Design Drawing

Course ID: FD145
Course Credits: 2
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This foundation level drawing course is for graphic design students to gain competency in traditional basic of drawing, including line, shape, tone, and space. Drawing from observation to depict form with accurate proportion and perspective is practiced, as well as creating diagrams to visually communicate in ways that are not directly observable.

GD+DM Advancement Review

Course ID: GD001
Course Credits: 0
Requirement: R
Course Description:
LCAD Design students will be required to successfully complete a portfolio review within their sophomore to junior in order to continue in the design program. This review is mandatory and is designed to assess your strengths, weaknesses, and academic readiness to move forward in the program.

Typography 1

Course ID: GD223
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: FD123, FD27, FD129
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This is an introductory course for the design major requiring conceptual, perceptual, manual, and computational skills to meet studio research into the history of letterforms and layout design. Projects explore compositional and structural aspects of letterforms, as well as various kinds of text layouts and their optical and interpretational effects. Computer applications: Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe InDesign.

Graphic Design 1

Course ID: GD224
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: FD123, FD127, FD129
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This is an introductory course for the design major. Studio practice explores the use of hierarchy, form, conceptual thinking, visual representation and interpretation, and the elements of communication. Projects address various essential graphic design formats: logotypes, promotional items, editorial design examples, announcements, and a variety of visual styles. Computer applications: Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe InDesign.

Typography 2

Course ID: GD225
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: GD223, GD224
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This intermediate course explores the underlying principles and elements of letterforms. Also explored are their usage, various grid-based layout systems, and typographic styles. Assignments emphasize visual representations of complex information through various editorial design formats, and are conceived as a means by which to analyze the semiotic function of text and its aesthetic and phenomenal qualities. Computer applications: Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe InDesign.

Graphic Design 2

Course ID: GD226
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: GD223, GD224
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This is an intermediate course in the Graphic Design major. Conceptual and practical solutions are emphasized in projects that are conceived to address and meet various communication objectives. Assignments are based on research, design process communication skills and professional presentation.

Computer Imaging

Course ID: GD230
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: FD127 + FD129 OR FD160+FD162
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This studio course in digital image making will challenge students to create thought-provoking and visually stimulating work while learning how to use the computer as a versatile tool for creation and manipulation. A range of projects will be developed while students consider the role of literal and implicit communication, aesthetics, and emotional impact. Computer applications: Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and Macromedia Flash (a beginning intro).

Special Topics

Course ID: GD235
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: GD225, GD226
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This course allows students to explore or participate in a class that is specifically focused on a special topic or opportunity. Example: Prints and Patterns _ using design skills to understand the development and set up for apparel print and pattern making.

3D-1: Animation for Motion Graphics

Course ID: GD251
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: FD137
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This advanced course introduces 3-dimensional computer modeling, concepts, technology and techniques (i.e., 3-dimensional virtual coordinate system, wire-frame, texture mapping, light source and camera positioning, etc.) through assignments that emphasize innovative object or product design and photorealistic representation.

Digital Photography 1

Course ID: GD275
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: FD127
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This lecture and studio course examines the use of digital cameras with a focus on essential skills relevant to artist and designers. Technical aspects of the course include principles of photographic exposure, lighting, and working with digital files. Artistic aspects of the course include considerations for effective communication and emotional impact, thematic unity, and image enhancement techniques. Primary software used: Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Bridge.

UI/UX for Entertainment

Course ID: GD301
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This course is a continuation of UI/UX 1. Students will develop a deeper understanding of user-centered research, process flow, and concept maps. They will create wireframes, prototypes and finished enabled interfaces. The course projects will address the design and development utilized in entertainment product interfaces and the skills needed to work on product development teams.

Color, Materials + Fabrication

Course ID: GD302
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
Color Marketing, and the field of Color, Material and Finish design is one of the fastest growing areas of design that is practiced in numerous different industries including apparel, automotive, consumer electronics, aviation, and almost all consumer goods manufactured worldwide. This discipline is used to create more meaning, emotional connection, and aesthetic value to products of all kind. Most professionals who work in the field come from a variety of backgrounds including graphics, branding, illustration, advertising, industrial and product design. The top global brands like Apple, NIKE, MINI, Beats, use color, materials, and finishes to create products that will succeed in the marketplace, and create more added value, and emotional connection to the products. It is one of the main factors in creating the DNA of any successful consumer product brand.

Experiential Design

Course ID: GD303
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This course is designed to enable the student to prepare a portfolio for professional employment, internship or display of work. The class will require that you have a body of your work to use in the development and a sense of the industry or audience that you are trying to reach with your site. This class is for the student that needs a portfolio but is not naturally geared towards being proficient with programming and scripting etc. Students will learn to create a website using tools and apps that make the development easier.

Communication Design 1

Course ID: GD312
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: GD225, GD226
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This is an intermediate course in the design major that focuses on the methods and principles of communication and the creation of meaningful content through the development of visual symbols, structures, and systems. The course will include extensive readings and in-depth research, the development and execution of strategic briefs, and both visual and verbal presentations.

Package Design 1

Course ID: GD314
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: GD225, GD226
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This advanced course requires conceptual, imaginative, manual, and computational skills to meet studio production and research resulting in projects that combine visual identity elements (such as logotypes, color palettes, typographic components, illustrations, and/or photographs). The course emphasizes a contextual approach to developing a brand or a line of products and its package as well as toward understanding the design processes that result in functional three-dimensional package solutions. Computer applications: Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe InDesign.

Action Sport Video 2: On Location

Course ID: GD315
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: FD127, FD129, GD232
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This course provides the opportunity for students to participate in project planning for location development projects. The course covers the art and science of non-linear production and editing. Students study field-production techniques and methods for developing, reporting, and storytelling through action video. Students learn how working on location, with various elements, impacts the final project and ultimately affect its success. Students are introduced to the production model of editing video for location shooting.

Digital Videography 1

Course ID: GD320
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: FD127, FD142, GD275
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course focusses on recording, editing, and compositing digital video files. Concepts and techniques of non-linear editing, compositing layers of computer generated imagery and live action video, special effects, camera movements and cinematic points of view, and design of titling and motion graphics will be covered. The work of professional animators, directors, and producers will be screened and discussed. This course covers the operation of video-capable devices and camcorders, including exposure control, use of lighting, and shot types. Techniques for working with title graphics and sound will also be demonstrated and practiced.

Internet Design 2

Course ID: GD331
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: GD231
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This course continues from the foundation established from Internet Design I, and adds advanced elements of interactivity, integration of time-based media (such as sound, video, and animation), and a higher level of technical sophistication. Emphasis is placed upon user interface design, navigational embellishments, and functionality (creating working form elements). Students will learn through a combination of lectures, software demonstrations, and hands-on development of web sites. Computer applications: Macromedia Flash, Macromedia Dreamweaver, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe ImageReady, Adobe Illustrator, and other multimedia editing applications.

Graphic Design Honors Lab

Course ID: GD333
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: GD225, GD226
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This course is an upper level elective where a selected group of students focus on in depth projects. The Honors Team environment simulates that of a working design office, school project or firm. Students take the first step into professional application of their talents through working on advanced more complex or multi-faceted projects individually and as a team. Honors lab looks at the business of design as well as the effect of the designer in business. Projects can also include LCAD material etc. Admission is by portfolio application.

Visual Merchandising

Course ID: GD334
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: GD225, GD226
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This course addresses the skills and logic needed to conceptualize and extend a brand to environmental applications. Bus wraps, events, retail spaces, billboards, buildings and exhibits are all mediums that have become the domain of the designer. This course focuses on projects that will teach the student how to design for these environments.

Digital Videography 2 - Motion & Movies

Course ID: GD350
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: GD320
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This course will allow the student to gain a more in-depth focus on creating and developing the skills needed to create more advanced digital videos (30 second ads marketing/promotional videos, and digital shorts, etc.). Students will learn and use Final Cut Pro, HD camera use, lighting techniques as needed. Students will learn the process needed to conceptualize and create final videos. Some use of special effects will be explored as well as the software used to create these effects.

Digital Photography 2

Course ID: GD375
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: GD275
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This lecture and studio course explores the use of digital cameras with a focus on essential skills relevant to artist and designers. Technical aspects of the course include principles of photographic exposure, lighting, and working with digital files. Artistic aspects of the course include considerations for effective communication and emotional impact, thematic unity, and image enhancement techniques. Primary software used: Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Bridge.

3D-2: Animation for Motion Graphics

Course ID: GD402
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This is an advanced course that explores, through assignments that emphasize narrative and stylistic qualities of dynamic, time-based presentations, computer modeling and concepts and techniques. Computer application: Maya.

Motion Graphics + Visual Effects 1

Course ID: GD411
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: FD142
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course builds on students existing design and typography skills and sets them in motion. Students in this course learn how to communicate messages by combining video, 3d, animation, and sound. This course focuses on Adobe master suite, After Effects, Maya, Sound Booth, and FinalCut Pro. Students will be storyboarding and executing motion graphics pieces that would be used in high definition television and on the web. Topics include typographic design, alpha channels, keys, masks, compositing 2D and 3D graphics, and video compression.

Communication Design 2

Course ID: GD413
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: GD312
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This is an intermediate course in the design major that focuses on the methods and principles of communication and the creation of meaningful content through the development of visual symbols, structures, and systems. Class will include extensive readings and in-depth research, the development and execution of strategic briefs, and both visual and verbal presentations.

Corporate Identity 2

Course ID: GD414
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: GD311
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This course offers continued studies in creating a brand and/or company identity. All major aspects of visual identity are emphasized with the course objective being to develop efficient, coherent, distinguishable, and competitive promotional design solutions based on market analyses. Computer applications: Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe InDesign.

Package Design 2

Course ID: GD415
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: GD314
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This course continues studies in product and package design and in the development of a brand or a line of products and its packaging. The class focuses on the interpretational, promotional, and functional aspects of three-dimensional package solutions. Computer applications: Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe InDesign.

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