Laguna College of Art and Design

Course Listings

Western Art History 1

Course ID: AH210
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: LA111
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course introduces students to art historical issues and important monuments from pre-history until the Renaissance period in the Western tradition. It establishes a social, political, and historical context for the production of art in society, and provides art students with a sense of the historical development of styles as a continuous tradition relating to their own work. This course is coordinated with the Western Civilization courses.

Western Art History 2

Course ID: AH220
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: AH210
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course introduces students to art historical issues and important monuments from the Renaissance through the mid-nineteenth century in the Western tradition. It establishes a social, political, and historical context for the production of art in society, and provides art students with a sense of the historical development of styles as a continuous tradition relating to their own work. This course is coordinated with the Western Civilization courses.

Van Gogh's Untold Journey

Course ID: AH300
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
Participants will consider the role of family, faith and artistic inspiration in the art of Van Gogh. They will consider the impact of literature on visual art production throughout his career. For instance, Van Gogh was profoundly influenced by literature and the illustration of stories. He was a life-long reader of Charles Dickens, Victor Hugo and others. Many of the central themes and ideas of his art were rooted in literary depictions and descriptions. Students will overview Van Gogh's formal and stylistic development and how it was a response to daily life issues and problems. He used his art to navigate through life in very practical ways. He was a deep thinker on the central problems in art and art theory and his practical wisdom was legendary as expressed in his existent 900 letters.

Rodin: The Man, The Time, The Art

Course ID: AH301
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This one semester course is offered in conjunction with a one-time exhibition at LCAD of selected small-scale bronzes by one of the most celebrated sculptors in western history. Students will discuss the personal and cultural circumstances out of which Rodin's powerful aesthetic language emerged. They will relate this historical matter directly to the handmade sculptural object contained in LCAD'S exhibition gallery--- cementing idea and image into one.

Delacroix

Course ID: AH302
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
In this seminar-style course, participants will read and respond to the journal of Delacroix on a weekly basis with written responses that will be shared with the entire class. Films and slide lectures will amplify the readings/responses and provide a historical and personal context for reflection and application to the students major. There will be lectures on the color theory and graphic focus of this leader in expressive 19th century art. Additionally, some of his musical influences such as Mozart, Chopin, etc., will be played and related to Delacroix's aesthetic views. The semester study will culminate with a term paper that will overview the essential ideas & insights found in this Delacroix seminar.

History of Entertainment Design

Course ID: AH304
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course examines the evolution of entertainment as a human and cultural activity. It looks at all forms of human amusement and its various manifestations throughout history. It explores the multidisciplinary role of artists and designer in making of entertainment productions from a historical and contemporary perspective. In additional to traditional entertainment venues that include theatrical stage, theme park and other physical local expressions, the course will examine the evolution of entertainment technologies from the early days of film and television to the present. It will provide some perspective into the future trajectories of both traditional and technological processes involving entertainment, and those creatively involved in its making.

Modern + Contemporary Art History

Course ID: AH320
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: AH220
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course addresses developments in art from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Although the course focuses on the western scene, issues of contemporary global art are also discussed. Museum and gallery visits are required.

History of Illustration

Course ID: AH331
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: LA104
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course is an examination of the major artists and trends in the history of illustration. The course emphasizes the development and role of illustration as an art form. Major fields covered include posters, comics, animation, computer graphics, editorial and advertising illustration, and book and magazine illustration. Required for Illustration majors.

History of Animation

Course ID: AH332
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: LA104
Requirement: R
Course Description:
The course examines the development of animation from its inception through present-day manifestations in television, films, and the Internet. Major animators and key works are analyzed and discussed. Required for Animation majors.

History of Graphic Design

Course ID: AH334
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: LA104
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course examines the emergence of graphic design and the professional designer from 1800 C.E. to the present. Continual conceptual and technological revolution is the essence of this subject and the theme of this course. Required for Graphic Design majors.

Asian Art History

Course ID: AH335
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
An introductory examination of the arts of China, Korea, Japan, Southeast Asia, India, and the Himalayas. This course uses the Asian collections of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Norton Simon Museum, and other public and private exhibition spaces for a close examination of the form and content of Asian artworks. The course will include lectures, guided readings, documentary resources, and required fieldwork.

History of Representational Painting

Course ID: AH337
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: LA104
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course seeks to trace the sources of the Western representational tradition from the nineteenth century to the present day. A key concern of the class will be to define the very nature of realism as an artistic perception. The demise of the so-called avant-garde has opened up an enormous diversity of artistic approaches, many of which are figurative. The course will examine some of these recent developments. This course is required for Fine Arts majors.

History of Game Art

Course ID: AH338
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: LA104
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course chronicles the history and evolution of game design while reflecting on its immediacy through the Internet and game culture trends. Students examine the social and artistic influences in computer-mediated communications, and consider game theory principles while examining the motive, strategy, competition, and psychology of the game.

History of AR/VR

Course ID: AH339
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: LA104
Requirement: R
Course Description:

Aesthetics

Course ID: AH420
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: AH210, AH220, AH320 + History of Major
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course includes consideration of such questions as: What is Art? What is Beauty? What is the role and responsibility of artists in society? Are there genuine standards by which we can judge art? Students have the opportunity to participate in dialogues concerning these questions.

Honors Aesthetics

Course ID: AH420H
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: AH210, AH220, AH320 + History of Major
Requirement: E
Course Description:
Students consider such questions as: What is Art? What is Beauty? What is the role and responsibility of artists in society? Are there genuine standards by which we can judge art? Students participate in dialogues concerning these and other crucial questions. Prerequisites: The Honors Aesthetics student should have a GPA of at least 3.25 and be prepared to engage in advanced analysis and practical application of aesthetic and philosophical ideas.

College Prep Writing 1

Course ID: LA010
Course Credits: 2
Requirement: E
Course Description:
A basic course in writing skills that is designed to teach students the fundamentals of grammar and conventional mechanics, including punctuation, spelling, vocabulary, appropriate diction, varied sentence structure, and clarity. The course is not required of all students but may be repeated as many times as necessary. Graded Pass/No Pass only, it does not count toward a student's GPA, but does count toward units earned. Course fees.

College Prep Writing 2

Course ID: LA011
Course Credits: 2
Requirement: E
Course Description:
A writing course that provides intensive practice in the writing of nonfiction prose, with an emphasis on grammatically correct sentence structure, paragraph construction, organizational strategies, and the development of ideas within the essay form. Like College Prep 1, this is a pre-baccalaureate developmental writing course that is not required of all students but which may be repeated as many times as necessary. Graded Pass/No Pass only, it does not count toward a student's GPA, but does count toward units earned. Course fees.

First-Year Seminar

Course ID: LA100
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course will examine diverse ways of optimizing students experience in college. Different aspects of the student and human experience will be covered, acclimating students to and improving the nature of the learning community. Guest experts will visit to discuss specialized aspects of the course content, and several classes will be devoted to putting the lessons into active practice via ?lab? sessions.

Directed Research + Writing 1

Course ID: LA103
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
"Directed Research and Writing" (Course numbers LA103, 203, 303 & 403 for Liberal Arts) will be able to be taken 1-3 units at a time, depending on the student's needs. These courses are not designed to teach an existing LA or AH course on an independent study basis. Rather, they will be similar to the graduate-level model, where we allow for specifically designed intensive studies in the student?s desired areas of interest. A student must be in good academic standing, have a mentor instructor who agrees to direct the study, and present to the mentor a proposed focus for the units earned; this then need then needs to be approved by both the instructor and chair. If approved, the instructor will craft the specifics re: assignments, workload, and learning outcomes for that semester?s study. Three units of credit would require roughly 5 books read and 5000-7000 words written over the course of the semester. Some of the writing could take the form of journals and more informal reflections, however a formal academic written analysis of some kind must be part of the writing produced. Also, museum visits or personal tours of artifacts, et al, may stand in lieu of some of the readings. We would let the instructor determine the balance, depending on the materials and areas of study; each case would be unique.

English Composition

Course ID: LA104
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: English Diagnostic
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course is the first leg of a full-year writing requirement and focuses on exploratory writing and methods of rhetoric. The goal is to provide the groundwork for the more sophisticated writing and thinking that is required later in their academic careers, as well as to help students reach a level of expository prose writing deemed appropriate for the university level. Classes are conducted in a workshop setting where students explore issues of craft as it relates to the process of writing.

Critical Reasoning

Course ID: LA111
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: LA104
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course prepares students for the writing, reading, and analysis required in their undergraduate education by learning various methods of argumentation, logic, and inquiry. Students practice their reasoning skills in writing assignments and discussions that demand analysis via critical reasoning. Assigned readings focus on basic philosophical questions and issues facing thinkers in all academic disciplines. This course helps students discover that writing is a natural, creative, and meaningful activity that helps them learn about themselves and the world. Students also learn the importance of questioning and critiquing the words and ideas of others. Ultimately, students experience first-hand how critical reasoning enables them to become informed and educated citizens of the world, with the abilities to affect change via their own words and actions. Successful completion of this course is a prerequisite for all Liberal Arts & Art History courses.

Poetry Workshop

Course ID: LA115
Course Credits: 1
Requirement: E
Course Description:
The primary goal of this course is to provide practice in the basics of poetry writing, with a simultaneous exploration of poetry's various theories and techniques. Students will be introduced to a variety of literary styles and devices via assigned readings by accomplished authors, with guided in-class discussions and group analyses of the craft at work in each piece (aspects such as meter, structure, rhyme, voice, tone, free verse, lyric, and form). Students will be required to complete a variety of writing assignments and similarly take part in close critiques of each other?s new writing, both in class and via written feedback composed away from class, providing textual analysis from both aesthetic and technical standpoints, articulating both emotional and intellectual responses to the works. Accomplished guest authors will visit the class to provide additional mentoring and inspiration. Excursions to public readings will augment classroom instruction. Class work may culminate in a formal publication and/or public performances (e.g., as part of LCAD?s Literary Companions Reading Series). By the end of the semester students will have broadened their understanding of the genre from a writer's perspective, improved their mechanics in regards to craft, and perhaps even taken several giant steps closer to discovering their own unique voices and visions as authors. Similar to how the College Preparatory Writing classes are structured (and how other courses accommodate both undergraduate and graduate students in the same class), LCAD?s Creative Writing Workshops will be able to simultaneously accommodate students taking the course as an Introductory Workshop (at the 100 level, practicing the basic craft essentials) and those in the more Advanced levels (200, 300, 400, working on more complex aspects of technique and voice, longer pieces, or a collection of works). While all levels will benefit from group feedback and critiques, individual assignments will be appropriate to the enrolment level.

Scientific Anatomy

Course ID: LA125
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: LA104
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This course provides an introduction to the human body structure and its functions. Skeletal, muscular, circulatory, nervous, and reproductive systems are studied. Projects are intended to prepare students for their studio experiences in life-drawing and life-painting. No other course may be substituted.

Social Ecology and Stewardship

Course ID: LA126
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This class explores social and ecological opportunities in the surrounding natural and cultural community.

American Sign Language

Course ID: LA143
Course Credits: 2
Requirement: E
Course Description:
An introduction to American Sign Language (ASL), designed for students who have no previous knowledge of ASL. Beyond basic grammar, vocabulary, fingerspelling, and numbers, students will develop beginning level ASL communication skills ? receptive listening and expressive speaking (facial expression, mime, and gesture). Students also learn about the cultural and historical context of ASL the Deaf Community, with an emphasis on making comparisons and connections to one?s own culture. As with our acting classes, courses in ASL may necessitate physical contact between students and/or instructor. This contact may include demonstrating culturally appropriate behaviors and/or remediating students? sign production. This course fulfills the Oral Communication degree requirement.

Intro to Poetry - Literary Survey, Analy

Course ID: LA192
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
William Carlos Williams suggests, "It is difficult to get the news from poems yet men die miserably every day for lack of what is found there." In this class, nobody dies. Through lecture, discussion, and writing exercises, students address the following topics: rhythm, image, form, diction, metaphor, condensed language, denotation, and connotation -- all keys to not only not dying but rather living a meaningful life.

Creative Writing Workshop: Literary Sum

Course ID: LA193
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
Taking place either in New York City (with excursions to surrounding areas) or The West Coast (San Francisco mainly, with perhaps Oregon and Washington hops). 10-14 nights in June-July; cost approx. $4,600 for airfare and hotel (with all taxes and surcharges included), transportation between cities, all museum/gallery/event entrance fees, several dinners, a few tours, meet-and greets with established authors, and tuition for the 3-unit class. Likewise, this class could be taken by any student to fulfill the Liberal Arts elective, or applied to a Creative Writing minor. As the literary counterpart to ?The New York Scene? Art History course, we?d study the writing generated from each area visited, but assignments would be mainly student?s own creative writing, inspired by the writing, art, and culture of each place. New York is the literary and publishing capital of the world, so there would be lots to do and see and write about there?from the legendary reading series at the 92nd Street Y and bookstores galore, to tours of publishing houses and the campuses of Columbia and NYU, to an ?Oscar Wilde in New York Walking Tour? and Shakespeare in the Park. Readings might include selections from Paul Auster, Galway Kinnell, Sharon Olds, William Kennedy, Edgar Allan Poe, Sarah Vowell, David Foster Wallace, Walt Whitman. If we head north instead of east, most of the trip would be centered in San Francisco with its legendary literary scene -- City Light Bookstore, The Six Gallery, Marin County Poets -- and readings might include works by Kim Addonizio, Isabel Allende, Philip K. Dick, Dave Eggers, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, CB Follett, James Houston, Jack Kerouac, Jack London, Tupac Shakur, Mark Twain. This West Coast trip might include a leg to explore the literary scenes of Oregon (Richard Brautigan, William Everson, William Stafford, Gary Snyder, Vladimir Nabokov, Ken Kesey), and/or Washington (Raymond Carver, Tom Robbins). Similar to how the College Preparatory Writing classes are structured (and how other courses accommodate both undergraduate and graduate students in the same class), LCAD?s Creative Writing Workshops will be able to simultaneously accommodate students taking the course as an Introductory Workshop (at the 100 level, practicing the basic craft essentials) and those in the more Advanced levels (200, 300, 400, working on more complex aspects of technique and voice, longer pieces, or a collection of works). While all levels will benefit from group feedback and critiques, individual assignments will be appropriate to the enrolment level.

Creative Writing Workshop: Multi-Genre

Course ID: LA194
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
The primary goal of this course is to provide practice in the basics of writing in multiple genres, offering students a wide range of options for expressing their stories and words regardless of the forms they may take. While traditional structures and vehicles such as songwriting and spoken word performance art would be included, this class is meant to help encourage daring and difficult works that may push the boundaries of established forms and formalities. This may include multiple-disciplinary literature, literary artwork, installations, interactive works, intertextuality, new media. Students will be encouraged to explore different avenues for their writing, understanding that there is no single "right way" to communicate a story, and that sometimes new inventions of form and even format is called for. Students will be required to complete a variety of writing assignments and similarly take part in close critiques of each other?s new work, both in class and via written feedback composed away from class, providing textual analysis from both aesthetic and technical standpoints, articulating both emotional and intellectual responses to the works. Accomplished guest authors will visit the class to provide additional mentoring and inspiration. Excursions to public readings will augment classroom instruction. Class work may culminate in a formal publication and/or public performances (e.g., as part of LCAD?s Literary Companions Reading Series). By the end of the semester students will have broadened their understanding of the genre from a writer's perspective, improved their mechanics in regards to craft, and perhaps even taken several giant steps closer to discovering their own unique voices and visions as authors. Similar to how the College Preparatory Writing classes are structured (and how other courses accommodate both undergraduate and graduate students in the same class), LCAD?s Creative Writing Workshops will be able to simultaneously accommodate students taking the course as an Introductory Workshop (at the 100 level, practicing the basic craft essentials) and those in the more Advanced levels (200, 300, 400, working on more complex aspects of technique and voice, longer pieces, or a collection of works). While all levels will benefit from group feedback and critiques, individual assignments will be appropriate to the enrolment level.

Art Spotlight

Course ID: LA195
Course Credits: 1
Requirement: E
Course Description:

Fiction Writing Workshop

Course ID: LA196
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
The primary goal of this course is to provide practice in the basics of fiction writing, with a simultaneous exploration of fiction's various theories and techniques. Students will be introduced to a variety of literary styles and devices via assigned readings by accomplished authors, with guided in-class discussions and group analyses of the craft at work in each piece (aspects such as structure, conflict, plot, character, point of view, setting, dialogue, voice, tone, narrative form). Students will be required to complete a variety of writing assignments and similarly take part in close critiques of each other?s new writing, both in class and via written feedback composed away from class, providing textual analysis from both aesthetic and technical standpoints, articulating both emotional and intellectual responses to the works. Accomplished guest authors will visit the class to provide additional mentoring and inspiration. Excursions to public readings will augment classroom instruction. Class work may culminate in a formal publication and/or public performances (e.g., as part of LCAD?s Literary Companions Reading Series). By the end of the semester students will have broadened their understanding of the genre from a writer's perspective, improved their mechanics in regards to craft, and perhaps even taken several giant steps closer to discovering their own unique voices and visions as authors. Similar to how the College Preparatory Writing classes are structured (and how other courses accommodate both undergraduate and graduate students in the same class), LCAD?s Creative Writing Workshops will be able to simultaneously accommodate students taking the course as an Introductory Workshop (at the 100 level, practicing the basic craft essentials) and those in the more Advanced levels (200, 300, 400, working on more complex aspects of technique and voice, longer pieces, or a collection of works). While all levels will benefit from group feedback and critiques, individual assignments will be appropriate to the enrolment level.

Creative Writing Workshop: Non-Fiction

Course ID: LA197
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
The primary goal of this course is to provide practice in the basics of non-fiction writing, with a simultaneous exploration of non-fiction's various theories and techniques. Students will become familiar with techniques and challenges related to a variety of non-fiction writing?biography, personal essay, memoir, historical profiles, newspaper reporting, magazine features, critical reviews. Students will be introduced to a variety of styles and devices via assigned readings by accomplished authors, with guided in-class discussions and group analyses of the craft at work in each piece (aspects such as structure, conflict, plot, character, point of view, setting, dialogue, voice, tone, narrative form). Students will be required to complete a variety of writing assignments and similarly take part in close critiques of each other?s new writing, both in class and via written feedback composed away from class, providing textual analysis from both aesthetic and technical standpoints, articulating both emotional and intellectual responses to the works. Accomplished guest authors will visit the class to provide additional mentoring and inspiration. Excursions to public readings will augment classroom instruction. Class work may culminate in a formal publication and/or public performances (e.g., as part of LCAD?s Literary Companions Reading Series). By the end of the semester students will have broadened their understanding of the genre from a writer's perspective, improved their mechanics in regards to craft, and perhaps even taken several giant steps closer to discovering their own unique voices and visions as authors. Similar to how the College Preparatory Writing classes are structured (and how other courses accommodate both undergraduate and graduate students in the same class), LCAD?s Creative Writing Workshops will be able to simultaneously accommodate students taking the course as an Introductory Workshop (at the 100 level, practicing the basic craft essentials) and those in the more Advanced levels (200, 300, 400, working on more complex aspects of technique and voice, longer pieces, or a collection of works). While all levels will benefit from group feedback and critiques, individual assignments will be appropriate to the enrolment level.

Creative Writing Workshop: Script Writing

Course ID: LA198
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
The primary goal of this course is to provide practice in the basics of script writing, with a simultaneous exploration of various theories and techniques related to creating scripted stories and storytelling techniques. Students will become familiar with common terminologies and structures?beat sheets, treatments, outlines, pitches, One Act, 3-act, 4-act, Teleplays, Screenplays, Documentaries, Multi-media, Graphic Novels, etc. Students will be introduced to a variety of styles and devices via assigned readings by accomplished authors, with guided in-class discussions and group analyses of the craft at work in each piece (aspects such as structure, conflict, plot, character, point of view, setting, dialogue, voice, tone, narrative form). Students will be required to complete a variety of writing assignments and similarly take part in close critiques of each other?s new writing, both in class and via written feedback composed away from class, providing textual analysis from both aesthetic and technical standpoints, articulating both emotional and intellectual responses to the works. Accomplished guest authors will visit the class to provide additional mentoring and inspiration. Excursions to public readings will augment classroom instruction. Class work may culminate in a formal publication and/or public performances (e.g., as part of LCAD?s Literary Companions Reading Series). By the end of the semester students will have broadened their understanding of the genre from a writer's perspective, improved their mechanics in regards to craft, and perhaps even taken several giant steps closer to discovering their own unique voices and visions as authors. Similar to how the College Preparatory Writing classes are structured (and how other courses accommodate both undergraduate and graduate students in the same class), LCAD?s Creative Writing Workshops will be able to simultaneously accommodate students taking the course as an Introductory Workshop (at the 100 level, practicing the basic craft essentials) and those in the more Advanced levels (200, 300, 400, working on more complex aspects of technique and voice, longer pieces, or a collection of works). While all levels will benefit from group feedback and critiques, individual assignments will be appropriate to the enrolment level.

Creative Writing: Storytelling

Course ID: LA199
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
Both a survey course and a creative writing course, the focus is on the art and craft of how stories are told across artistic genres. Storytelling is employed in various ways within each of our studio majors: literary devices and narrative techniques can add richness and depth to artwork, regardless of genre. By learning about comparative storytelling across cultures, and by practicing some of these techniques via original writing assignments, students gain a deeper understanding of how the human story can be effectively told. Satisfies either the writing leg of the Creative Writing Minor or the American Cultural Experience (in some semesters, the Non-Western Cultural Experience Requirement). Enrollment priority will be given to Creative Writing Minors.

Creative Writing Workshop: Literary Summ

Course ID: LA200
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
Under the guidance of LCAD Creative Writing faculty, students travel to various cities to experience first-hand both the historic and currently thriving literary centers. We will visit author?s homes and stomping grounds, bookstores, museum/gallery/events, and meet and workshop with established authors. Students will be assigned directed readings focusing on writing either generated from or written about each area visited, and assignments will be the student?s own creative writing?inspired by the writing, art, and culture of each place. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. This class could be taken by any student to fulfill the Liberal Arts elective, or applied to the Creative Writing minor.

The Politicalization of Everything

Course ID: LA201
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
Since 1954 when the Supreme Court handed down its decision in Brown v. Board of Education, which sought to desegregate American schools, the people of the United States have been engaged in what some have come to call the ?culture wars? in which even the most intimate things have become subject to politicization: sex, marriage, language, education, spiritual life, housing patterns, gun ownership, art, music, movies, literature, media, sports, access to bathrooms. Everything from abortion and bussing in schools to Gamergate and Drag Queen Story Hour falls under the rubric of a longstanding, and increasingly tribal culture war in the United States. In this course we will look at the broad historical context ? segregation, Cold War, Vietnam, the Summer of Love ? from which these battles emerged and trace them through the present, paying particularly close attention to the ways in which the legal expansion of rights, freedoms, and liberties for historically marginalized groups often elicited conservative reactions seeking to roll back those gains. Through open discussion, the politicization and policing of everything as a means of reasserting a traditionalist, and often sectarian, vision of culture on an increasingly liberal (and liberated) secular society will be examined. This course will focus on flashpoints or sites of contestation?Roe v. Wade, the reaction to the artist Andres Serrano?s Piss Christ (1987), the Oklahoma City Bombing, the North Carolina ?Bathroom Bill? and many others ? via contemporaneous media coverage and analysis. Students will produce written responses to the readings and also formulate a final project (with a written component) urgent to the awareness of policing and politicization of contemporary culture.

From Utopia to Nostalgia

Course ID: LA202
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
In 2001 as the cold war context of global history was on the cusp of being reframed by 9/11, Harvard professor of Slavic Languages, Svetlana Boym wrote that the twentieth century had ?began with a futuristic utopia? and ?ended with nostalgia.? Over the ensuing two decades of post-industrialism the world has witnessed an even more rightward lurch toward nationalism, austerity, xenophobia, homophobia, and political violence?all rooted in myths of a culturally traditionalist and ethnically/ religiously homogeneous past. In this course we will interrogate the historical, political, and aesthetic contexts of this regressive, though nuanced, shift from utopian thinking to nostalgic longing by paying particularly close attention to the changing nature of these two elastic concepts as they come to frame the ideologically contested poles of not only past and future, but also left and right in a world of seeming rapid material and environmental decline. By looking at authors such as Boym (along with Walter Benjamin, Hannah Arendt, and Masha Gessen among others), as well as literature, film, art, and other visual and material culture that depict both utopia and nostalgia, we will seek to understand how the world could recover from the shattering experiences of two World Wars and the Holocaust only to dissolve once again into myths of nostalgic purity at the expense of the cosmopolitan dream of a pluralist, multicultural, and openly democratic future. Students will produce essays that respond to course materials and also formulate a final project (with a written component) which considers envisioning the future.

Food, Nutrition, & Health

Course ID: LA212
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
Scientific concepts of nutrition relating to the functioning of nutrients in the basic life processes. Emphasis will be on individual needs, food sources of nutrients, current nutrition issues, and diet analysis. The course will address eating disorders, changing nutritional needs during the lifecycle, the relationship between nutrition and certain chronic diseases.

Project Green: Surf Culture

Course ID: LA213
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
A survey class examining the historical, cultural, socio-economic, and environmental importance of surfing and its related activities. Through lectures and an examination of films, print advertisements, novel excerpts, newspaper and magazine articles, environmental publications, scholarly essays, and excerpts from novels, students will think, read, and write about surf culture. Topics will include: ?The History of Surfing?; ?Art History of Surfing?; ?Surfing and Music: From Ukeleles to Fender Strats?; ?Surfing and the Silver Screen?; ?Surf Slang: Aloha Mr. Hand?; and ?Surfers, Beatniks, and Other Outlaws.? The modern surfing industry will also be examined through a cultural perspective that analyzes business practices, philosophy, and branding via topics such as: ?Board Design and Manufacturing?; ?Extreme Action Sports: Surf, Snow, Skate, Moto, BMX?; ?Surfing and Fashion: From Hula Skirts to Haute Couture?; and ?Surfing and World Commerce.? Environmental aspects of Surf Culture will be examined via such topics as: ?The Oceans: Perfect Storms and Rogue Waves?; ?The Surfer as Activist: From Surfrider to Sea Shepherd?; ?Pollution, Coastal Cliff Erosion, and Man-Made Seawalls?; and ?Surfing and Eco-Tourism.?

American Culture

Course ID: LA215
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This course focuses on the United States as a pluralistic society and highlights the issues that we face as a nation undergoing profound changes. This course satisfies the American Culture requirement.

Comix as American Literature

Course ID: LA216
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
(A cultural approach to American culture this course satisfies the American Culture requirement.) This course considers the history of the comic medium and its place in American culture, not only as an aspect of pop culture, but as a struggling art form unique to this country. Strongly recommended for Illustration majors.

Contemporary Issues in American Society

Course ID: LA217
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
(A political science approach to American culture this course satisfies the American Culture requirement.) This course acts as an exploration of current political, social, and economic issues in the United States. Emphasis is on issues of a controversial nature.

American Literature

Course ID: LA218
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This is a survey course of the Literature of the United States, and may focus on a specific author (or group of authors), time period, theme, or culture.

Defining Space on a Globe

Course ID: LA220
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This course will explore the interconnections between the world's regions and human development as it varies across the globe. Physical environment as it relates to human welfare will be considered within regions such as Asia, South America, Africa, Europe and North America. Surveying the cultural, social, political, historical and environmental narratives of these places will be the initial starting point. In addition, we will examine concepts related to the construction (social and political) of our nations, states and territories. We will approach territory-both urban and rural-on regional and local levels, before tackling issues on the role landscape can play in our understanding of space (using North American cities as our case studies). As an understanding of global relations is dependent upon local and regional landscapes/events, we will spend much of the semester focusing on these issues.

Environmental Ecology

Course ID: LA222
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This course explores the human relationship with our environment in a historical and contemporary context. We will examine the collapse of ancient civilizations as well as the ecological challenges we face in today's modern world. Students will investigate local and global environmental issues and discover the symbiotic relationship we share with our ecology.

Foundations of Western Civilization

Course ID: LA223
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This interdisciplinary course examines Western intellectual and cultural foundations through synthesizing primary resources in literature, philosophy, religious, myth, psychology, religion, and music. The course encompasses ideas and monuments in the evolution of thinking and creating, from pre-Socratic Greeks to the present dislocation of modern man. It is organized around the three major eras that have traditional distinguished Western Cultural history: the classical, the medieval, and the modern. The objective is to discover the immediacy of the here and now in historical resources. The approach to the resources is personal and visceral with the ultimate ideal objective of applying assimilated cultural experiences to the process of living and of making art.

Intellectual History of Man's Relationship w/ Nature

Course ID: LA224
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
In the course we will examine ancient and modern human societies and their relationship with their environment. Diverse cultural and ecological factors will be explored to identify variables contributing to altered environmental conditions. Students will investigate modern environmental problems facing our planet with an emphasis on the history of our changing local ecology.

Non-Western Cultural Experience

Course ID: LA225
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This anthropology course explores a variety of non-western adaptations to universal challenges such as economic systems, marriage, subsistence patterns, art, religion and more. Numerous non-western cultures are studied including, but not limited to, Mbuti Pygmies, Native Americans, Chinese, traditional African groups, Amazonian tribes, New Guinea groups, Pacific Islanders, and the Japanese.

Pre Columbian + Mexican Culture

Course ID: LA226
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
Beginning with the pre-Columbian cultures of the Olmec, the Maya, and the Mexica, and concluding with modern and contemporary expressions in Latin American and Chicano literature, art, philosophy, and cinema, this interdisciplinary humanities course will survey the rich and complex cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world.

Islam and the West

Course ID: LA227
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
A political science course that examines the relationship between Islam (from its rise in the seventh century to the present) and the West.

Gender Studies in Popular Culture

Course ID: LA228
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
The consumption of popular culture is a pleasurable pursuit but comes with the cost of underlying dominant assumptions about gender, race, class and sexuality. Even as we determine the terms of our engagement with advertising, television, film, music and gaming, popular culture privileges certain social identities and marginalizes others. This 3-unit course seeks to provide you with the theoretical tools for understanding how our notions of self and community are shaped by the culture industry. How are concepts of gender constructed by the images and messages around us? What kinds of desires are elicited by different media? How do normative gender expectations intersect with other identifications of race, ethnicity and socio-economic class? We will analyze the intersection of gender and popular culture in order to denaturalize (but not denigrate) the persuasive power of popular culture.

Multicultural Healing

Course ID: LA229
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
The course facilitates understanding of the human being as an integrated physiological, psychological and social organism. This course provides a cross-cultural perspective of health and healing by looking at ethnic groups in the U.S. as well as a global perspective. Personal awareness of health-related issues may be expected to broaden with this exposure to diverse cultural approaches.

Mathematics

Course ID: LA231
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This course reviews basic concepts and processes in arithmetic as well as key concepts and questions in geometry. The course explores questions in the philosophy of mathematics regarding the nature of numbers, space, infinity, and truth, as well as topics of concern to artists such as proportion, the Golden Mean, and the mathematics of light.

Personal Finance + The Artist

Course ID: LA232
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
A survey of basic financial skills for artists, this class will teach the fundamental principles of finance that are relevant to sole proprietor artists and to artists working in the corporate environment. The goal of this course is to have students leave with the building blocks for a successful personal financial career. The class will begin with basic economic principles that business owners and individuals should understand in order to grasp the course?s topics. Students will learn about personal financial responsibility, including student aid loans, budgeting, credit-building, investments, and also about 401ks and other retirement portfolios. The course will also focus on operating a small business, including such topics as setting up the business, basic tax knowledge (including ways to lower one?s tax burden), personal bookkeeping, and cost controlling.

American Cinema

Course ID: LA233
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
A survey of the cinema of the Americas, this course may zoom in to examine a particular filmmaker or set of filmmakers, or a specific time period, or theme, or genre as a touchstone for understanding the greater culture of a time and place, including the social conditions from which the art emerged and why it was important. This Fall we will debut the course by examining Comedy and Horror, each of which is adept at capturing the evolution of the American zeitgeist. Consider Billy Wilder?s commentary on gender during the 1950s in Some Like It Hot; Alfred Hitchcock?s timeless deliberation on fear as it relates to authority in Psycho; George Romero?s exploration of 1960s disillusionment in The Night of the Living Dead, Robert Altman?s 1970 satiric slam of the Vietnam War (in the guise of Korea) in M*A*S*H, and Mel Brooks? condemnation of prejudice in 1974?s Blazing Saddles. Using American Comedy and American Horror as its lens, this course will expose students to the American experience by taking a close look at the fears, insecurities, obsessions, and prejudices that are distinctly American.

Project GREEN: From Ridge to Reef

Course ID: LA234
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
Project GREEN: From Ridge to Reef will take a systems approach that integrates Project GREEN: Ocean and Project GREEN: Hillside, by considering the greater regional watershed and its impact on the regeneration and sustainability of local natural resources, particularly water quality. The course will help foster a greater understanding of the regional watershed as a valuable asset to the ecological health of hillside and the coastal ocean environments. Students will have the opportunity to expand the digital media assets discussed above with the addition of ?Voices of the Earth,? an archive of Earth observations and educational materials. As with Project GREEN: Ocean, there is great potential for further collaboration with organizations such as the Laguna Canyon Foundation (Hillside), as well as with new partners such as the Crystal Cove Alliance (Coastal Ocean), the Ocean Institute, and the Aquarium of the Pacific. Collaborations with these organizations would provide opportunities for students to apply what they learn in the classroom to meaningful, conservation projects that are valued by the community. Dr. Schubel has strong connections with the Aquarium of the Pacific's administration, education and exhibit staff, and has initiated a growing, collegial relationship Laguna Canyon Foundation. She has met both groups about various collaborative projects that they would be interested in working on with LCAD, as part of its Project GREEN. The next logical extension of Project GREEN is to move from ridge to reef, as it were. We have always seen this as the natural progression for the Project GREEN course sequence: we start in our own backyard on LCAD property, move to the protected wilderness hillside area overseen by LCWP, and then move toward the coast and deeper oceans. This title reflect a ?zooming out? of the lens of study; we would combine content from both currently funded Marisla Grant Project GREEN courses, Hillside and Ocean, as we expand into the reefs and deeper waters; this thereby provides the larger perspective and message that all of our restoration and ecological efforts are inter-connected, for the earth as a whole should be seen as one living organism.

Introduction to Psychology

Course ID: LA235
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This course explores the basic psychological concepts underlying human behavior and development. Students may gain an understanding of the history of the science of psychology and how it has advised our culture over the last century.

Introduction to Linguistics

Course ID: LA236
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This course explores the science of how language changes and how it is learned, focusing on speech sounds, sound patterns, how words are formed and organized into sentences, and eventually understood. Students will discover the properties that languages have in common and how they differ. By surveying the features of many languages and various subfields in linguistics, this course may be used to fulfill the non-western cultural requirement. This course also satisfies the Liberal Arts elective.

Financial Literacy

Course ID: LA237
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:

The Voyeuristic Gaze

Course ID: LA238
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
Geishas and courtesans in Edo Japan, ballerinas and prostitutes in Paris: The visual representation of women in Japan and France in the nineteenth century is simultaneously erotic, intriguing, and disturbing. The course will probe the voyeuristic gaze manifested in artwork from East and West. An examination of the representations of women from Edo Japan and Paris, France will demonstrate the interdisciplinary connections between the visual arts and gender studies. Artists will include Utagawa Kunisada, Tsukioka Yoshitoshi, Edgar Degas, Mary Cassatt,and Jean-Louis Gerome.

Project Green: Hillside

Course ID: LA239
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This course is an ecological survey of the native flora and fauna of our surrounding wilderness area. Students will collaborate as a research team to participate in the ecological restoration of a coastal sage scrub community, develop research questions, document results, and propose further research. The canyon offers a unique outdoor class environment, applied research opportunity, and a rewarding experience of engaged stewardship in our ecological community.

Project Green: Oceans

Course ID: LA242
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
Project GREEN: Ocean is designed to provide students with a broad introduction to the coastal oceans of Orange County. As a part of the course work, students will observe, analyze physical processes and distribution of organisms in the intertidal and shallow zones, and document their findings. These findings will be translated into digital educational materials that will be made available to the public. Students will also investigate coastal processes, coastal marine ecosystems (kelp forests, the intertidal zone) and the impact of humans on the coastal ocean. Students will study the marine mammals that call the Orange County coast home, for migratory seasons, or for all of the year.

The Zombie Zeitgeist

Course ID: LA244
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This course explores the zombie as a literary, historical, and pop culture archetype, focusing on the role of the zombie in horror, adventure, fantasy, and satiric literature and film. Spanning Antiquity to the present, this course surveys literature, cinema, and critical theory to examine the earliest precedents of the undead in the Ancient and Classical world, the origins of zombies in West Africa and the Caribbean, their adoption in Western culture, and their subsequent proliferation in Latin America, Asia, and (back to) Africa. Zombies provide an ideal means through which to examine cultures and issues of xenophobia, globalization, capitalism, and individuality. It is a symbol that has crossed many borders, reaching truly global status in the last twenty years. Weekly assignments will require written reflection and analysis.

Introduction to Philosophy

Course ID: LA245
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:

Pre-Columbian Culture

Course ID: LA246
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This course surveys prehistoric art of the Americas, beginning with pre-state societies and concluding with vast empires on the eve of the Spanish conquest (c. 2000 BC - A.D. 1500). Both North and South America are considered and examples of mundane and high art from other areas of the world are introduced for comparative purposes. The overall focus is to instill an understanding of the cultural practices which generated the various art styles and the thematic content which allow us to speak of commonalities and differences among art styles throughout the Americas.

Introduction to Sociology

Course ID: LA247
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
Designed to introduce students to a sociological understanding of how we build and live in communities. With a strong emphasis on the psychology of power structures, social institutions, social reasoning, and social constructivism, this course helps students to understand the role of the individual within the larger society. With a broad scope into the science of groups, topics may also include urgent current events to build a vivid understanding of the social interactivity in everyday life.

Art and Culture World Cinema

Course ID: LA249
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
A survey international in its scope of the history, theory, techniques, and development of motion pictures. This course reviews the history of film as an art form and of its major artists, works, and styles.

Human Evolution

Course ID: LA250
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This course provides an overview of the theories of human origins. Areas emphasized include human genetics, selective pressures, Darwinian gradualism, continental drift, migration patterns, mammals, comparative anatomy, and the fossil record. A quantitative approach is employed.

Acting for Animators

Course ID: LA251
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: R
Course Description:
The challenge for the animator is to create the illusion of life in animated images. This course involves the animator in theoretical considerations of performance, analyses of animated films, and studio experiences aimed at realizing the animator's goal of creating the illusion of life in animated images. This course is reserved for Animation majors.

Art and Culture of Africa

Course ID: LA252
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
The class will focus on Africa, with emphasis on its societies and most importantly on their material cultures. The class will study the adaptation of humans to diverse environments and the resulting characteristics manifested in their social structures, art, economy, political organizations and religions. A multidisciplinary approach among anthropology, sociology, art history and art will be the method utilized for the class. This diverse approach should also help make the class more interesting. A strong emphasis on visual aids will enhance the topics developed.

Cultural Wonders of Ancient Asia

Course ID: LA253
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
Exposes the student to the cultural, aesthetic, religious, and historical achievements of ancient Asian cultures, including those of China, Japan, India, Southeast Asia, Tibet, and others. Some of the many topics explored include early and sustained contact between the East the West, and cultural interactions between Asian cultures in the past that have shaped this part of the world as we see it today.

Human Diversity

Course ID: LA255
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
Human Diversity explores biological variation in modern humans, biological concepts of species and subspecies and the race concept from a social perspective. Following completion of this course you should have a greater understanding of the misuse of the term _?_race,_ܝ an appreciation of human biological diversity, and a grasp of the adaptive nature of human variation.

Human Sexuality

Course ID: LA260
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
Human Sexuality is a course that combines lectures, films, discussions and research regarding our sexuality from physiological, psychological and sociological perspectives. Topics include history, anatomy, reproduction, cross-cultural perspectives, gender roles, myths, safety and variations in sexual expression.

Feminist Literature

Course ID: LA280
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:

Graphic Novels

Course ID: LA281
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:

World Literature

Course ID: LA290
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:
This course may focus on a specific author, period, theme, or culture.

Contemporary Literature

Course ID: LA291
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: E
Course Description:

Adv Creative Writing: Poetry Workshop

Course ID: LA292
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: LA192
Requirement: E
Course Description:
The primary goal of this course is to provide practice in the basics of poetry writing, with a simultaneous exploration of poetry's various theories and techniques. Students will be introduced to a variety of literary styles and devices via assigned readings by accomplished authors, with guided in-class discussions and group analyses of the craft at work in each piece (aspects such as meter, structure, rhyme, voice, tone, free verse, lyric, and form). Students will be required to complete a variety of writing assignments and similarly take part in close critiques of each other?s new writing, both in class and via written feedback composed away from class, providing textual analysis from both aesthetic and technical standpoints, articulating both emotional and intellectual responses to the works. Accomplished guest authors will visit the class to provide additional mentoring and inspiration. Excursions to public readings will augment classroom instruction. Class work may culminate in a formal publication and/or public performances (e.g., as part of LCAD?s Literary Companions Reading Series). By the end of the semester students will have broadened their understanding of the genre from a writer's perspective, improved their mechanics in regards to craft, and perhaps even taken several giant steps closer to discovering their own unique voices and visions as authors. Similar to how the College Preparatory Writing classes are structured (and how other courses accommodate both undergraduate and graduate students in the same class), LCAD?s Creative Writing Workshops will be able to simultaneously accommodate students taking the course as an Introductory Workshop (at the 100 level, practicing the basic craft essentials) and those in the more Advanced levels (200, 300, 400, working on more complex aspects of technique and voice, longer pieces, or a collection of works). While all levels will benefit from group feedback and critiques, individual assignments will be appropriate to the enrolment level.

Adv Creative Writing: Multi-Genre Work

Course ID: LA294
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: LA194
Requirement: E
Course Description:
The primary goal of this course is to provide practice in the basics of writing in multiple genres, offering students a wide range of options for expressing their stories and words regardless of the forms they may take. While traditional structures and vehicles such as songwriting and spoken word performance art would be included, this class is meant to help encourage daring and difficult works that may push the boundaries of established forms and formalities. This may include multiple-disciplinary literature, literary artwork, installations, interactive works, intertextuality, new media. Students will be encouraged to explore different avenues for their writing, understanding that there is no single "right way" to communicate a story, and that sometimes new inventions of form and even format is called for. Students will be required to complete a variety of writing assignments and similarly take part in close critiques of each other?s new work, both in class and via written feedback composed away from class, providing textual analysis from both aesthetic and technical standpoints, articulating both emotional and intellectual responses to the works. Accomplished guest authors will visit the class to provide additional mentoring and inspiration. Excursions to public readings will augment classroom instruction. Class work may culminate in a formal publication and/or public performances (e.g., as part of LCAD?s Literary Companions Reading Series). By the end of the semester students will have broadened their understanding of the genre from a writer's perspective, improved their mechanics in regards to craft, and perhaps even taken several giant steps closer to discovering their own unique voices and visions as authors. Similar to how the College Preparatory Writing classes are structured (and how other courses accommodate both undergraduate and graduate students in the same class), LCAD?s Creative Writing Workshops will be able to simultaneously accommodate students taking the course as an Introductory Workshop (at the 100 level, practicing the basic craft essentials) and those in the more Advanced levels (200, 300, 400, working on more complex aspects of technique and voice, longer pieces, or a collection of works). While all levels will benefit from group feedback and critiques, individual assignments will be appropriate to the enrolment level.

Adv Creative Writing: Fiction Writing W

Course ID: LA296
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: LA196
Requirement: E
Course Description:
The primary goal of this course is to provide practice in the basics of fiction writing, with a simultaneous exploration of fiction's various theories and techniques. Students will be introduced to a variety of literary styles and devices via assigned readings by accomplished authors, with guided in-class discussions and group analyses of the craft at work in each piece (aspects such as structure, conflict, plot, character, point of view, setting, dialogue, voice, tone, narrative form). Students will be required to complete a variety of writing assignments and similarly take part in close critiques of each other?s new writing, both in class and via written feedback composed away from class, providing textual analysis from both aesthetic and technical standpoints, articulating both emotional and intellectual responses to the works. Accomplished guest authors will visit the class to provide additional mentoring and inspiration. Excursions to public readings will augment classroom instruction. Class work may culminate in a formal publication and/or public performances (e.g., as part of LCAD?s Literary Companions Reading Series). By the end of the semester students will have broadened their understanding of the genre from a writer's perspective, improved their mechanics in regards to craft, and perhaps even taken several giant steps closer to discovering their own unique voices and visions as authors. Similar to how the College Preparatory Writing classes are structured (and how other courses accommodate both undergraduate and graduate students in the same class), LCAD?s Creative Writing Workshops will be able to simultaneously accommodate students taking the course as an Introductory Workshop (at the 100 level, practicing the basic craft essentials) and those in the more Advanced levels (200, 300, 400, working on more complex aspects of technique and voice, longer pieces, or a collection of works). While all levels will benefit from group feedback and critiques, individual assignments will be appropriate to the enrolment level.

Adv Creative Writing: Non-Fiction Writ

Course ID: LA297
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: LA197
Requirement: E
Course Description:
The primary goal of this course is to provide practice in the basics of non-fiction writing, with a simultaneous exploration of non-fiction's various theories and techniques. Students will become familiar with techniques and challenges related to a variety of non-fiction writing?biography, personal essay, memoir, historical profiles, newspaper reporting, magazine features, critical reviews. Students will be introduced to a variety of styles and devices via assigned readings by accomplished authors, with guided in-class discussions and group analyses of the craft at work in each piece (aspects such as structure, conflict, plot, character, point of view, setting, dialogue, voice, tone, narrative form). Students will be required to complete a variety of writing assignments and similarly take part in close critiques of each other?s new writing, both in class and via written feedback composed away from class, providing textual analysis from both aesthetic and technical standpoints, articulating both emotional and intellectual responses to the works. Accomplished guest authors will visit the class to provide additional mentoring and inspiration. Excursions to public readings will augment classroom instruction. Class work may culminate in a formal publication and/or public performances (e.g., as part of LCAD?s Literary Companions Reading Series). By the end of the semester students will have broadened their understanding of the genre from a writer's perspective, improved their mechanics in regards to craft, and perhaps even taken several giant steps closer to discovering their own unique voices and visions as authors. Similar to how the College Preparatory Writing classes are structured (and how other courses accommodate both undergraduate and graduate students in the same class), LCAD?s Creative Writing Workshops will be able to simultaneously accommodate students taking the course as an Introductory Workshop (at the 100 level, practicing the basic craft essentials) and those in the more Advanced levels (200, 300, 400, working on more complex aspects of technique and voice, longer pieces, or a collection of works). While all levels will benefit from group feedback and critiques, individual assignments will be appropriate to the enrolment level.

Adv Creative Writing: Script Writing W

Course ID: LA298
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: LA198
Requirement: E
Course Description:
The primary goal of this course is to provide practice in the basics of script writing, with a simultaneous exploration of various theories and techniques related to creating scripted stories and storytelling techniques. Students will become familiar with common terminologies and structures?beat sheets, treatments, outlines, pitches, One Act, 3-act, 4-act, Teleplays, Screenplays, Documentaries, Multi-media, Graphic Novels, etc. Students will be introduced to a variety of styles and devices via assigned readings by accomplished authors, with guided in-class discussions and group analyses of the craft at work in each piece (aspects such as structure, conflict, plot, character, point of view, setting, dialogue, voice, tone, narrative form). Students will be required to complete a variety of writing assignments and similarly take part in close critiques of each other?s new writing, both in class and via written feedback composed away from class, providing textual analysis from both aesthetic and technical standpoints, articulating both emotional and intellectual responses to the works. Accomplished guest authors will visit the class to provide additional mentoring and inspiration. Excursions to public readings will augment classroom instruction. Class work may culminate in a formal publication and/or public performances (e.g., as part of LCAD?s Literary Companions Reading Series). By the end of the semester students will have broadened their understanding of the genre from a writer's perspective, improved their mechanics in regards to craft, and perhaps even taken several giant steps closer to discovering their own unique voices and visions as authors. Similar to how the College Preparatory Writing classes are structured (and how other courses accommodate both undergraduate and graduate students in the same class), LCAD?s Creative Writing Workshops will be able to simultaneously accommodate students taking the course as an Introductory Workshop (at the 100 level, practicing the basic craft essentials) and those in the more Advanced levels (200, 300, 400, working on more complex aspects of technique and voice, longer pieces, or a collection of works). While all levels will benefit from group feedback and critiques, individual assignments will be appropriate to the enrolment level.

Professional Studies for Fine Artists

Course ID: LA322
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course combines classroom and field activities and covers topics such as portfolio development, photographing and presenting art work, self-promotion, graduate school admission, professional organizations and small business practices (including legal guidelines, such as tax and copyright laws). Resources include guest artists, speakers of interest and field trips.

Professional Studies for Animators

Course ID: LA324
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course concentrates on preparing students to enter team-based creative environments with emphasis on digital portfolio and reel development, communication skills, industry networking opportunities and success strategies for collaborative projects.

Professional Studies for Game Artists

Course ID: LA325
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This course concentrates on preparing students to enter team-based creative environments with emphasis on digital portfolio and reel development, communication skills, industry networking opportunities and success strategies for collaborative projects.

Professional Studies for Designers

Course ID: LA326
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This lecture/studio course introduces students to business practices, thereby bridging the gap between the educational experience and the professional world of the graphic designer. Topics include self-promotion, processes and intricacies of finding work, printing processes and collateral, general business guidelines, billing clients, contracts, and professional organizations.

New Media Auteur

Course ID: LA380
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: R
Course Description:
This Liberal Arts course is developed especially with the Experimental Animation student in mind. Where many approaches to character animation lead directly to mainstream industry, students of experimental animation may also choose to pursue an artistic life in new media. This class covers topics of the modern media ?auteur?, including online video platforms, podcasts, social media strategies, mobile apps and other ways of distributing animation content while creating a presence and defining an artistic identity in virtual space. The course is designed to be continually adapting to and adopting new platforms and strategies as they evolve. Although designed for the animator, this course can be taken by students of other artistic disciplines as well.

Adv Creative Writing: Poetry Workshop

Course ID: LA392
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: LA292
Requirement: E
Course Description:
The primary goal of this course is to provide practice in the basics of poetry writing, with a simultaneous exploration of poetry's various theories and techniques. Students will be introduced to a variety of literary styles and devices via assigned readings by accomplished authors, with guided in-class discussions and group analyses of the craft at work in each piece (aspects such as meter, structure, rhyme, voice, tone, free verse, lyric, and form). Students will be required to complete a variety of writing assignments and similarly take part in close critiques of each other?s new writing, both in class and via written feedback composed away from class, providing textual analysis from both aesthetic and technical standpoints, articulating both emotional and intellectual responses to the works. Accomplished guest authors will visit the class to provide additional mentoring and inspiration. Excursions to public readings will augment classroom instruction. Class work may culminate in a formal publication and/or public performances (e.g., as part of LCAD?s Literary Companions Reading Series). By the end of the semester students will have broadened their understanding of the genre from a writer's perspective, improved their mechanics in regards to craft, and perhaps even taken several giant steps closer to discovering their own unique voices and visions as authors. Similar to how the College Preparatory Writing classes are structured (and how other courses accommodate both undergraduate and graduate students in the same class), LCAD?s Creative Writing Workshops will be able to simultaneously accommodate students taking the course as an Introductory Workshop (at the 100 level, practicing the basic craft essentials) and those in the more Advanced levels (200, 300, 400, working on more complex aspects of technique and voice, longer pieces, or a collection of works). While all levels will benefit from group feedback and critiques, individual assignments will be appropriate to the enrolment level.

Adv Creative Writing: Multi-Genre Work

Course ID: LA394
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: LA294
Requirement: E
Course Description:
The primary goal of this course is to provide practice in the basics of writing in multiple genres, offering students a wide range of options for expressing their stories and words regardless of the forms they may take. While traditional structures and vehicles such as songwriting and spoken word performance art would be included, this class is meant to help encourage daring and difficult works that may push the boundaries of established forms and formalities. This may include multiple-disciplinary literature, literary artwork, installations, interactive works, intertextuality, new media. Students will be encouraged to explore different avenues for their writing, understanding that there is no single "right way" to communicate a story, and that sometimes new inventions of form and even format is called for. Students will be required to complete a variety of writing assignments and similarly take part in close critiques of each other?s new work, both in class and via written feedback composed away from class, providing textual analysis from both aesthetic and technical standpoints, articulating both emotional and intellectual responses to the works. Accomplished guest authors will visit the class to provide additional mentoring and inspiration. Excursions to public readings will augment classroom instruction. Class work may culminate in a formal publication and/or public performances (e.g., as part of LCAD?s Literary Companions Reading Series). By the end of the semester students will have broadened their understanding of the genre from a writer's perspective, improved their mechanics in regards to craft, and perhaps even taken several giant steps closer to discovering their own unique voices and visions as authors. Similar to how the College Preparatory Writing classes are structured (and how other courses accommodate both undergraduate and graduate students in the same class), LCAD?s Creative Writing Workshops will be able to simultaneously accommodate students taking the course as an Introductory Workshop (at the 100 level, practicing the basic craft essentials) and those in the more Advanced levels (200, 300, 400, working on more complex aspects of technique and voice, longer pieces, or a collection of works). While all levels will benefit from group feedback and critiques, individual assignments will be appropriate to the enrolment level.

Adv Creative Writing: Fiction Writing Wkshp

Course ID: LA396
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: LA296
Requirement: E
Course Description:
The primary goal of this course is to provide practice in the basics of fiction writing, with a simultaneous exploration of fiction's various theories and techniques. Students will be introduced to a variety of literary styles and devices via assigned readings by accomplished authors, with guided in-class discussions and group analyses of the craft at work in each piece (aspects such as structure, conflict, plot, character, point of view, setting, dialogue, voice, tone, narrative form). Students will be required to complete a variety of writing assignments and similarly take part in close critiques of each other?s new writing, both in class and via written feedback composed away from class, providing textual analysis from both aesthetic and technical standpoints, articulating both emotional and intellectual responses to the works. Accomplished guest authors will visit the class to provide additional mentoring and inspiration. Excursions to public readings will augment classroom instruction. Class work may culminate in a formal publication and/or public performances (e.g., as part of LCAD?s Literary Companions Reading Series). By the end of the semester students will have broadened their understanding of the genre from a writer's perspective, improved their mechanics in regards to craft, and perhaps even taken several giant steps closer to discovering their own unique voices and visions as authors. Similar to how the College Preparatory Writing classes are structured (and how other courses accommodate both undergraduate and graduate students in the same class), LCAD?s Creative Writing Workshops will be able to simultaneously accommodate students taking the course as an Introductory Workshop (at the 100 level, practicing the basic craft essentials) and those in the more Advanced levels (200, 300, 400, working on more complex aspects of technique and voice, longer pieces, or a collection of works). While all levels will benefit from group feedback and critiques, individual assignments will be appropriate to the enrolment level.

Adv Creative Writing: Non-Fiction Writ

Course ID: LA397
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: LA297
Requirement: E
Course Description:
The primary goal of this course is to provide practice in the basics of non-fiction writing, with a simultaneous exploration of non-fiction's various theories and techniques. Students will become familiar with techniques and challenges related to a variety of non-fiction writing?biography, personal essay, memoir, historical profiles, newspaper reporting, magazine features, critical reviews. Students will be introduced to a variety of styles and devices via assigned readings by accomplished authors, with guided in-class discussions and group analyses of the craft at work in each piece (aspects such as structure, conflict, plot, character, point of view, setting, dialogue, voice, tone, narrative form). Students will be required to complete a variety of writing assignments and similarly take part in close critiques of each other?s new writing, both in class and via written feedback composed away from class, providing textual analysis from both aesthetic and technical standpoints, articulating both emotional and intellectual responses to the works. Accomplished guest authors will visit the class to provide additional mentoring and inspiration. Excursions to public readings will augment classroom instruction. Class work may culminate in a formal publication and/or public performances (e.g., as part of LCAD?s Literary Companions Reading Series). By the end of the semester students will have broadened their understanding of the genre from a writer's perspective, improved their mechanics in regards to craft, and perhaps even taken several giant steps closer to discovering their own unique voices and visions as authors. Similar to how the College Preparatory Writing classes are structured (and how other courses accommodate both undergraduate and graduate students in the same class), LCAD?s Creative Writing Workshops will be able to simultaneously accommodate students taking the course as an Introductory Workshop (at the 100 level, practicing the basic craft essentials) and those in the more Advanced levels (200, 300, 400, working on more complex aspects of technique and voice, longer pieces, or a collection of works). While all levels will benefit from group feedback and critiques, individual assignments will be appropriate to the enrolment level.

Adv Creative Writing: Script Writing Wkshp

Course ID: LA398
Course Credits: 3
Pre-Requisite: LA298
Requirement: E
Course Description:
The primary goal of this course is to provide practice in the basics of script writing, with a simultaneous exploration of various theories and techniques related to creating scripted stories and storytelling techniques. Students will become familiar with common terminologies and structures?beat sheets, treatments, outlines, pitches, One Act, 3-act, 4-act, Teleplays, Screenplays, Documentaries, Multi-media, Graphic Novels, etc. Students will be introduced to a variety of styles and devices via assigned readings by accomplished authors, with guided in-class discussions and group analyses of the craft at work in each piece (aspects such as structure, conflict, plot, character, point of view, setting, dialogue, voice, tone, narrative form). Students will be required to complete a variety of writing assignments and similarly take part in close critiques of each other?s new writing, both in class and via written feedback composed away from class, providing textual analysis from both aesthetic and technical standpoints, articulating both emotional and intellectual responses to the works. Accomplished guest authors will visit the class to provide additional mentoring and inspiration. Excursions to public readings will augment classroom instruction. Class work may culminate in a formal publication and/or public performances (e.g., as part of LCAD?s Literary Companions Reading Series). By the end of the semester students will have broadened their understanding of the genre from a writer's perspective, improved their mechanics in regards to craft, and perhaps even taken several giant steps closer to discovering their own unique voices and visions as authors. Similar to how the College Preparatory Writing classes are structured (and how other courses accommodate both undergraduate and graduate students in the same class), LCAD?s Creative Writing Workshops will be able to simultaneously accommodate students taking the course as an Introductory Workshop (at the 100 level, practicing the basic craft essentials) and those in the more Advanced levels (200, 300, 400, working on more complex aspects of technique and voice, longer pieces, or a collection of works). While all levels will benefit from group feedback and critiques, individual assignments will be appropriate to the enrolment level.

Aesthetics

Course ID: LA420
Course Credits: 3
Requirement: R
Course Description:
Students consider such questions as: What is Art? What is Beauty? What is the role and responsibility of artists in society? Are there genuine standards by which we can judge art? Students have the opportunity to participate in dialogues concerning these questions.